March 26, 2008

It's a Learning Process

Hey, Kids! Don't try this at home. I did, and I regretted it. As I've said before, sometimes I try to use my own experiences as an example for others. In this case, something to avoid.

Something else I've said before is that I have Type 2 diabetes. Don't worry, you can't catch it. It's pretty well under control when I pay attention. On Easter Sunday, I wasn't paying close enough attention. Sure, I can have some dessert (which has sugar) and an extra helping of potatoes (which have starch). Too bad I didn't know that the ham had a kind of sugar glaze or something. And that sugar was added to the corn. When everything was added up, it was harmful.

Two hours after eating, I took a blood reading. And almost fell off my chair because it was my all-time high. Now, other diabetics might look at my number of about 223 and say, "Big deal." Well, the normal range for a healthy adult is 80-120, and my doctor wants me around 100 (which it has been more often than not).

But it was a shock to me, and I overcompensated. Instead of taking one of my remedies, I took three. The third was the worst, because I took an additional 1,000 mg. of Metformin (an oral insulin that I normally have just twice a day, but I did one more). Shoulda stopped with the cinnamon tablet and vinegar water as my first response, but I was wound up and acting like a cafone.

Well, I was getting nervous. Thought it was what I was reading about Tibet, and some things I had e-mailed that were, uh, strongly-worded. I stepped outside to settle down. When I came back in, I was feeling worse. "This isn't a nerve thing", I thought.

I was shaking and pale, and decided to do an extra blood reading. Almost fell off the chair again. I was down to 65! A crash was coming on. I dropped 158 points in an hour or two, no wonder I was feeling weird. So, I had to bring it back up. What a friggin' roller-coaster ride. I ate some things (wasn't hungry, but what are you gonna do?) and I felt better, eventually.

What I did was like smashing a mosquito with a sledgehammer: It kills the bug, but ruins your floor. It had been said to me that dealing with diabetes is a learning process. I learned. It wasn't life-threatening, but it may have threatened my retaining consciousness. Maybe some diabetics can relate to my little story. For everyone else, I have a lesson: don't overcompensate. Respond a little at a time.

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